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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
. but parole. within eight years he could be eligible. this person did america a favor by helping out our droops out of iraq and afghanistan, reporting the wars weren't going anywhere as well as the president wanted to us do be. just just like daniel in vietnam and he needs our thanks. >> you recognize size the other side of that as well. >> you couldn't run a government if people were allowed to make these jump little, if we have good internal systems for whistle blowing and a system where you could get off, make it a defense that it was in the public interest. >> thank you for being with us, the senior managing attorney at the certainty for constitutional right here in new york. good to talk to you. flesh. >> you are thanks for having me. >> wild fires burning in the west are now threatening a national treasure. in northern california, a 25 square mile fire is out of control nereo sim at this national park. more than 50 fires are threatening people and property across at least 10 western states, the national i want agency fire center is now at its highest state of alert. that has not ha
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
, but john tyler's views were consistent. letitia was different. >> here is 1840 view of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control le
>> welcome to al jazeera america. here is a look at our headlines. the syrian government accused of chemical warfare on its own people, the the opposition group said the government killed hundreds of women and children. former egyptian president hosni mubarak may be released from house arrest within a few hours. and bradley manning sentenced to 35 years behind bars for leaking classified information. now his attorney wants help from the president. [♪ music ] >> we begin tonight with atrocities in syria and accusations of chemical warfare. it could put more pressure on president obama to get involved in the dispute. opposition groups are claiming that the government used chemical weapons in the overnight offensive. we want to warn you that some of the pictures we want to show you are extremely graphic. they show injured people being treated by hospital workers while others lie motionless. activists athey are victims of banned chemical weapons fired by government forces. and other video shows survivors struggling to breathe. al jazeera cannot verify the videos but if proved true
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
attended the u.s. army war college in pin in pennsylvania. there are security issues where the america needs cooperation. the security and the u.s. warships routinely transit an. each day in egypt fuel the call to cutoff aid. the detention of sti of spiritul leader brought this from the white house. >> that's not in line of the standard to uphold in respect to human rights. >> the relationship we skwreupt is deep. a decision to cutoff aid would carry wide reprocushions. al jazeera, washington. >> he's the associate professor of literature. welcome. >> thank you. >> give me your rea*bs to what you're seeing in egypt today and in washington. what if the united states cuts aid. what would that mean? >> i think united states should cut aid it seems to me that aid mostly to american. military cooperations for one thing. it also goes directly in to the military which is a guanator in egypt. that's been the case for a while. it seems to me that is increasingly of the society. >> the fact that egypt has been historically a strong allie of the united states what does that mean are regard to th
and the administration is absolutely right when they say they want and america wants inclusive tolerant institutions in egypt. the question is, how do build them, and we -- the way to build them is not to burn them down. that's why i think we should retain our strong rlelationship with the military. not because we condone it or agree with it, it's the only power in town. if we going rebuild egypts institution, it's better to rebuild from within than burn them down and start from scratch. simply put, the big state is better than no state. that's the only choice facing us nous. >> countries at odds with each other. israel and the non-secular people, the black costuming people, who really want a religious state's in people in northern ireland who want to be forever a part of britain and others who very much want to be a republic of ireland. here are here want sharia led, real islamic law, political power and other people who are just egyptians who want to live the way egyptians have lived for thousands of years. can they be co-habitating? is in a model for them to cohabitate that country? >> that's a q
exposure to europe, china, latin america. you know i think europe and china are turning, one of the reasons why the euro is so strong for europe term. as for latin america, bud's business has been held back by the weakness in brazil. i know brazil's troubled, but i don't think that weakness is going to last. the world cup comes to brazil in 2014 followed by the olympics in 2016. i think you're going to believe those are going to be pretty darn good for beer sales. bud sells for 17.4 times next year's earnings estimates, gets fair priced considering all the good things going this company's way. although, of course, obviously like everybody else, like it on a pullback. here's one. this is what the crowd drinks in summit, molson coors, tap, i see it similar to bud but with less international exposure and a stock run up further. specifically 18% year-to-date. that's why i'm saying that bud has more room to run because it's well behind this one. and certainly well behind this one, although, this one is an up and comer. suppose you want something stronger than beer, though, then the pick is very
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
.5 million this quarter. almost 50% of our business in north america is mobile. we're focused on migrating from being a daily deal e-mail business to being a true e-commerce marketplace where we now have over 54,000 deals live every day in north america. and we're focused on taking what's working in north america where we saw 23% growth in q1 accelerate to 30% in q2. and really give that to the rest of the world. we're by no means done. we've got a long way to go. >> now, you're alluding to the fact that though you have seen significant growth in the u.s., there is still significant weakness internationally. what's your plan to get the rest of the world on track? >> i mean, we saw some good improvement this quarter. europe shrank 8% year over year in q1. and that accelerated to 4% growth in q2. so that's pretty significant growth. we're now focused on taking the stuff that works. we know when we bring more deals to the market it has a huge effect. when we can get consumers to basically start with groupon when they want to buy anything anywhere, any time, we know that has a huge impact. and
between race and the criminal justice system. lawyer part of the moving america towards justice series. march onlso a special washington event. to haverivileged today a dynamic group of individuals who will guide our coverage around the complicated tough relationship between race and the criminal justice system. a briefrovide introduction for each panelist. they will then be allowed a short amount of time to present their area of expertise and focus and then we will open the floor after i have a series of brief questions to the panel. we will open the floor for your questions. i hope that you have gotten the cards and written your questions down. you will be holding them up so our people can collect them and bring them to me to read. before we get to the panel, it is a pleasure for me to introduce the president of the national bar association, patricia rosier. -- i just can't have her come up. she is the president of the national bar association, the nation's largest association of african american lawyers in justice. portionedicated a major of her life's work to the bar association. s
told this reporter the great thing about america is there's all these jobs. that's not something americans think, like there's all these jobs. the other thing on these immigrants said was, the other great thing about america is that if you work hard you can get ahead in this country. >> i was here in texas a month or two ago, and it was a small business, just one little taxi come and the driver was an immigrant. i asked him about his experience when he came to america. he said when i arrived it was like i was woken up and i had these opportunities. >> i think it's kind of ambitious drive that is unique to immigrants. let's face it, there's -- 99% of the people in the world never move from where the girl. watauga but the 1% of people are ambitious enough and courageous enough to leave your homeland is a very courageous thing to do. so this is as an economist, i just think this is one of the kind of innate advantages of having immigration. number one, they are preselected for kind of economic success. and number two, this gets back to my point about china, let's face it, the bigges
of the egyptians. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it is tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> joining me today, political editor and white house correspondent at "the huffington post," sam stein. "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, founder and editor at large, charlie senate, jon meacham author of "thomas jefferson -- the art of power." joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman muhyeldin. we're hearing from the spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood that they want to remain nonviolent and peaceful. we are also at the same time hearing news that there is live ammo being launched by morsi supporters and molotov cocktails. can you give us the latest on the situation on th
call minds in america is set to join us tonight. we're going to ask larry sabato about what's wrong with the deck kratz today. hillary clinton's presidential chnss and get a look at the big new online course and all about the legacy of john f. kennedy. all of those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report" coming up right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." the federal reserve minutes. did they tell us anything? steve liesman joins us in jackson hole. >> good evening, larry, from jackson hole where the fed is gathering. they're gathering without ben bernanke and mario draghi. the fed is releasing its minutes from the july meeting in which it showed no clear intention as to the tapering in september. the committee is split with a few members saying the fed should be patient before tapering. there was not enough economic data and a few members saying the fed should stick to the plan announced in june. quote, it might soon be time to taper. almost all of the participants were pretty comfortable with the june guidance which said that t
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
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listen america, nixon now ♪ nixon now, nixon now he's shown us how ♪ ♪ nixon now, nixon now, listen america, nixon now ♪ >> president nixon's victory in the election is surely one of the biggest land slides ever. let's look at the popular vote with almost all of it counted. 98% of the precincts reporting, nixon 45 million, mcgovern, 28 million. this adds up to a record breaking 520 electoral votes for president nixon, who won 49 states. mcgovern carried only massachusetts and the district of columbia for 17 electoral votes. >> at first, it was called the watergate caper. five men apparently caught in the act of burglarizing and bugging democratic headquarters in washington. but the episode grew steadily more sinister. no longer a caper, but the watergate affair escalating finally into charges of a high level campaign of political sabotage and espionage, apparently unparalleled in american history. the charges center around a man whose name means secrets. >> donald segretti. white house aides recruited him for secret intelligence fork and dirty tricks against the democrats. he went
offered a chilling prediction for america that she calls inevitable. we will cover her less than an uplifting words. next. with centurylink as your trusted partner, our visionary cloud infrastructure and global broadband network free you to focus on what matters. with custom communications solutions and responsive, dedicated support, we constantly evolve to meet your needs. every day of the week. centurylink® your link to what's next. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is one take away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraced as secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also the first woman to hold the
napolitano offered a chilling prediction for america th she calls inevitable. inevitable. we will cover her@áh%h%k%k%k5 aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your goodriving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. the. lori: and outgoing homeland security secretary napolitano leaves as long as surveying secretary after holding the position 4.5 years this season to a tax of america's sial and our chief corresppndent has our report. >> consider taking questions to napolitano address the national press club here in washington. >> looking back i can say there is oneake away one object lesson of a core operating principle i have learned and embraceds secretary it is this, in a world of the fall the threats come to the key to our success is the ability to be flexible and agile. >> the longest serving homeland security secretary also th
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
to be buying. the president of the americas jerry smith joins us exclusively. good to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> thank you for joining us. a good story you are selling more tablets and devices than pcs, right? >> we are proud of that. in the quarter, we had an outstanding quarter. it's a reflection of our strategy, we are now teleselling more phones than tablets. that's a part of our pc plus. we believe we are a device company now. >> i want to ask you about. that all the speculation out there is what is going to happen with blackberry. are you in a position to acquire blackberry in. >> i can't comment on possible acquisitions. i will say right now organically we grew our smartphone business successfully. we will look at potential value and if it fits from a strategy perspective as well. >> so let's look at the difference here him i have a black brry in my hand. can these two merge and be a better device? what do you think, jerry? >> we will keep looking at all opportunities. >> why wouldn't you buy blackberry in they're so popular? what would stop you, seriously in. >> i think
need to do we need to acquit allies, it cannot look like america jumping in to another civil war in the middle east trying to get involved. this should be the world community coming together, not everybody in the world, we need to make it clear we have no interest in getting in the middle of this civil war, no interest in choosing sides and getting out. lori: can you pinpoint but chemical weapons? can you take out those chemical weapons with a missile strike or do you have to have boots and the ground? do you know the particulars of that? >> some say you have to have. on the ground. everything i read from credible people that i trust say that you can do this from a standoff, you can have ships in the mediterranean, tomahawk cruise missiles equipped in a certain way but if these syrian chemical weapons depots, we know the israelis have done this, they have bombed and taken out syrian chemical weapons sites, i don't know why we couldn't be able to do that but if we go and think we are going to topple assad or kill assad what is the next government that goes after assad? al qaeda. t
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
-in movie theaters. now the drive-ins threatened with extinction. the vice president of honda america will be here with that companies plan to save drivers coming up. "markets now" continues in a moment. stay with us. see, the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels. and that gelling hes to lower some cholesterol. metacil. 3 amazing benefits in 1 super fiber. hundred pound gorilla of retail, walmart, pressure at this hour responsible for 14 points of losses. the retailer cutting its annual profit forecast, we debate the wear and the why of walmart's problems with our panel. raising the roof on housing yet again, home builder confidence rising to the highest level in eight years. a brand new feature on fox business as we break down home construction costs. plus savings driving movie theaters, once they were plenty but not yet threatened with extinction, vice president of honda america to help save and american institution. it is exactly the top of the hour as we go 15 minutes, stocks and l. the steepest decline since june 20th, nicole petallides watching the data, the numbers
higher for the remainder of the year. and, again, in 2014, we'll talk to the ceo of america's natural gas alliance. and next, as we head to break, a look at july's best and worst-performing dow components. if you're serious about taking your trading to a higher level, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then schwab is the place to trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-888-284-9410 or visit schwab.com/trading to tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 learn how you can earn up to 300 commission-free online trades tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for six months with qualifying net deposits. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see how easy and intuitive it is to use tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 our most powerful platform, streetsmart edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 we put it in the cloud so you can use it on the web. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade with our most advanced tools tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 on whatever computer you're on. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 also, get a dedicated team of schwab trading specialists tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 who will help you customize your platform tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 even from the comfort of your home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and talk about ideas and
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
to revolutionize high-speed travel in america. phil lebeau joins us now. we understand his announcement, more details in maybe an hour's time. >> we'll hear about the hyperloop, or at least his vision of it. the hyperloop hoopla is what we're looking at, because we don't have an indication of what he's going to tell us. he told us it's a theory. not a company he's forming. it's his vision of the future. it will be solar-powered and have the cost lower than what it would take to take a comparable trip in planes or trains. he tweeted a few hours before he pulled an all-nighter developing his hyperloop plan. the hyperloop will have an open architecture, so in other words, if other technology companies, other software engineers, if they want to add to the hyperloop that he throws out there, that's a possibility. i want to show you the animation, because this is the vision of a company out of colorado. et-3, it's developing tube transport technology. it's already issuing licenses to technology partners, similar to what musk has talked about, an open architecture. et-3 says tube transport costs wil
-market system in the united states of america. [applause] i am working every day to try to help carry that free-market message and try to help when the argument. how many of you have phones on you? take out your phones and text the word growth to 33733. text "growth" to 33733. we are working to try to build a conservative army across this country that will stand up and fight to bring us back to our free-market principles, bring us back to our constitutional liberties, and the only way we can do it is to bring together millions of conservatives across the country. freedom is not some abstract academic concept. it is something we know in our own lives. in my life, my dad was born in cuba. he was imprisoned and tortured, almost beaten to death. he fled in 1957, fleeing the batista regime. he was 18 and could not speak a word of english. nothing but $100 in his underwear. i don't advise carrying money in your underwear. he washed dishes to pay his way to the university of texas. he went on to start a small business, to work words the american dream. my dad used to say to me over and over again, and
've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> labor day just a couple of weeks away. we're firing up the barbecue because it's cookout week here on "mad money." and you know what, this cookout really couldn't have come at a better time. with the market feeling like it's ready to take a bit of a breather, you might want to side l up to more defensive stocks. perhaps in the spirit of what liquor can do for you. last night, i told you about the healthy organic food i'll be grilling up. you can't have a barbecue with nothing more than just tofu and soy milk. the key ingredient to any cookout is brewskis. and looking like we've got a burgeoning red hot bull market in the beer stocks. in the first four weeks ending on the 3rd, beer sales up 3.8%. that's a huge acceleration from the 1.8% increase in the pre
. plus, hundreds of feet beneath a mcdonald's a hidden chamber where america stored nukes. >> this is constantly alarmed and there is a guard course protecting this facility. >> for decades it was a secret. >> the rumors have been around forever. >> there was a feeling that there was something going on down here. now, fox news takes you inside the lois los alamos nuclear tunnel. first from fox this wednesday night, the baby shot to death in his stroller. today, in court heard from a teenager who stood and watched as an older teen shot 13 month old santiago in the face. police call the younger teen an accomplice. prosecutors have asked him to testify as the older teen stands trial. both suspects face murder charges. this is the teenager on trial now. police say he tried to rob the mother on a street in southeast georgia back in march. they say the mom claimed she didn't have any money and that's when the teen shot her in the leg and in the ear and shot the baby in the head. one bullet. between the eyes. but defense attorneys have suggested the mother had a financial interes
america. for the entire time there i tried to get bourbon i couldn't. this is back in '80s, early '90s. >> right. david: scotch is their main drink. i imagine the same is true for asia. have you changed that already? >> same thing with me. i started about 25 years ago. in my first trip to london you couldn't find a bottle of jack daniels in a pub. now we're one of the largest selling spirits in the u.k. it has been dramatic change over last 25 years. where i started we sold four million of cases of jack daniels. most of that was in the united states. mostly 95%. now we're selling over 11 million cases of sway jack daniels in 150 countries, black label is the high-end bourbon. >> old number 7 is our flagship brand with the black label on it. that is our other story for us we have a family of brands. gentleman jack, jack single barrel are more expensive. both growing double-digit growth. our rtd business, in cans and bottles is millions of cans and bottles around the world growing five or 6%. our newest family member, jack daniels, tennessee whiskey or tennessee honey is selling nearly 8
.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know how billionaires are investing *their money. insider monkey reveals warren buffett and others are buying shares of davita. the company owns kidney dialysis centers. billionairs are also bullish on sirius satellite radio company verisign. another popular stock with 1-percenters is an internet registry services company. and billionairs are also big on credit card stock visa. investors are keeping their eyes on priceline. the stock is closing in on a milestone: $1,000 a share. in its latest earnings, priceline notes "tremendous momentum" going forward. strength in europe helped revenues. noodles and company, which went public earlier this summer, is trading lower after its first set of earnings failed to increase investor appet
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
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